15/05/21
 
Über diesen Blog
DECOLONIZING COLLECTIONS – NETWORKING TOWARDS RELATIONALITY   Decolonizing – Dieser Blog möchte einen Beitrag zur Dezentrierung der Debatte über koloniale und ethnographische Sammlungen, Archive und Museen leisten. Unser Ziel ist es, koloniales Wissen und vorherrschende epistemische Praktiken kritisch zu reflektieren, auch in unserer eigenen Praxis zu überwinden und damit zugleich die hierarchischen Trennungen zwischen Zentrum […]

Africa’s Fight for Its Art
A Conversation between Bénédicte Savoy and Nanette Snoep.
In her latest book „Africa’s Fight for its Art. Geschichte einer Postkolonialen Niederlage“ (History of a Post-Colonial Defeat), Bénédicte Savoy, the French art historian and expert in the field of restitution, traces the struggle of African states for the return of their artworks stolen by the European colonial rulers, which has now lasted over 50 […]

Towards the Anticolonial Museum
Dan Hicks and Ciraj Rassool talk about the failure of ethnographic museums in the Global North and the need to rethink them in anticolonial terms. Together with Nanette Snoep and Nina Möntmann, they explore the notions of white infrastructures and necrographies that Dan emphasizes in his latest book, The Brutish Museums. This interview is part […]

Will Provenance Research Delay Restitution of Looted African Artefacts?
There have been in recent months many references to provenance research whenever there have been discussions on restitution of looted African artefacts that are in Western museums and institutions. The impression often arises as if provenance research and restitution were inextricably linked. However, some supporters of provenance research make it clear that the two are […]

Restitution of Knowledge:
Beyond Nefertiti
“Nefertiti can be a symbol for empowering women and should return to Egypt”, says Monica Hanna. She explains why restitution is about objects and the knowledge about objects. In her interview with Richard Bussmann, Monica Hanna talks about ethnic diversity and the Nubia Museum in Aswan, the future of archaeology in Egypt, Egypt’s positioning between […]

A Response to Horst Bredekamp
In an op-ed entitled “Fanatics of Purity”, published on March 8 in the Frankfurter Allgemeine Zeitung (FAZ), the prominent art historian Horst Bredekamp — a founding director of the Humboldt Forum, and a director of the international research group of which I am a member – declares “postcolonialism” and “political correctness” to be nothing less […]

Centering Indigenous Humanity
Michelle Moyd and Stefanie Michels discuss contentious issues in African history and historiography, such as agency, resistance, and sovereignty and how these interact with current public debates about the colonial past. This interview is part of our new „Museums in Motion Workshop Series“. Contributions in the form of podcasts will be uploaded every Tuesday. The […]

Egypt’s Dispersed Heritage
Museum Cultures in Context
The heritage of Ancient Egypt is dispersed across the globe, with little recognition of the complex histories implied in objects. In this conversation with Richard Bussmann, Anna Brus, Juliane Hornung, Stefanie Michels, Ciraj Rassool, and Martin Zillinger, Alice Stevenson positions the study of ancient Egypt in the broader context of decolonization, knowledge production and museum […]

Present Imperfect, Future Intense:
The Digital Opening of the Humboldt Forum
On December 16, 2020, the Humboldt Forum—a major cultural centre in the middle of Berlin—officially opened. Due to the COVID-19 pandemic, the opening took place online and consisted of two events: a press conference and an opening ceremony. Ambitious and expensive, the Humboldt Forum has been fraught with controversy ever since it was conceived. And […]

DCNtR Debate
The Gender of Ethnographic Collecting
It has long been accepted that colonialism had a distinctive epistemic dimension, which was upheld by disciplines such as social anthropology and other knowledge-making projects. Under this colonial episteme, people and human experiences were hierarchically classified according to racial categories and ethnography and ethnographic collecting were key components in these processes. However, the colonial regime […]

On Decolonizing Knowledge Production and the Museum
Telling the Complex Stories of One Museum Object
Mirjam Brusius and Ulrike Lindner talk about new ways to include marginalized voices into the discussion on heritage and museums. They address the importance of acknowledging academic as well as non-academic forms of knowledge in order to tell different stories and to make them more accessible to wider audiences. As a means to move forward […]