07/16/19

The end of negotiations!?

Whereas the 1990s were still marked by a certain globalisation euphoria in which there removal of barriers in social processes of negotiation appeared to be achievable on a global scale, the social upheavals that have emerged in the meantime in relation to globalisation can no longer be ignored. The belief that worldwide exchanges could contribute to the emergence of a ‘global ecumene’ is gradually ceding to an awareness that existing or newly emerging forms of inequality, exclusion, isolationism and fortification contribute to new forms of social boundary-making. This also pertains to the question concerning with whom and under what conditions, in which ways and with which goals social actors engage in social negotiations with others – if at all. But processes of polarisation and ideological closure in the relations between different social groupings are also becoming more virulent within nation states. Taking recourse to different registers of social and cultural distinctions, disjointed and introverted spaces of social negotiation are emerging – such as in the fragmented publics of social media – that hardly take notice of each other, or that make any type of dialogue dependent on abiding by one’s own terms.

In the course of the German Association for Cultural and Social Anthropology’s conference of the same name from September 29-October 2, 2019, this blog searches for empirical descriptions and analyses of what social actors in certain situations and contexts set as ‘non-negotiable‘ – whether for strategic reasons, based on ideological convictions, or out of life-preserving necessity. The blog aims to critically discuss current processes in which the potentially unlimited dynamics of social negotiation are brought to an end by acts of closure or opened to new negotiations after a temporary closure.

Like all boasblogs, the blog “The End of Negotiations!?“, in the sense of a public anthropology, aims to make scientific findings accessible to a broader public in order to make a critical-constructive contribution to current social debates and to help shape social relations at various political, social and everyday levels.
Language: English & German

Please contact the editorial team:

Thomas Kirsch – thomas.kirsch@uni-konstanz.de
Michi Knecht – knecht@uni-bremen.de
Ehler Voss – ehler.voss@uni-siegen.de